понедельник, 11 января 2016 г.

364. Esoteric Psychology - Volume I - 07. Section One - CHAPTER II - Certain Questions and Their Answers Question 1. What is the soul. Can we define it? What is its nature? - Part 2 - A. BAILEY

Section One - CHAPTER II - Certain Questions and Their Answers

Question 1. What is the soul.  Can we define it?  What is its nature? - Part 2

2. The personal soul or the subtle coherent sum total which we call the Personality, composed of the subtle bodies, etheric or vital, astral or emotional, and the lower mental apparatus.  These three vehicles humanity shares with the animal kingdom as regards its possession of vitality, sentiency, and potential mind; with the vegetable kingdom as regards vitality and sentiency; and with the mineral kingdom as regards vitality and potential sentiency.
3. The soul is also the spiritual being, or the union of life and quality.  When there is the union of the three souls, so called, we have a human being.
Thus in man you have the blending or fusion of life, quality and appearance, or spirit, soul and body, through the medium of a tangible form.
In the process of differentiation these various aspects have attracted attention, and the underlying synthesis has been overlooked or disregarded.  Yet all forms are differentiations of the soul, but that soul is one Soul, when viewed and considered spiritually.  When studied from the form side, naught but differentiation and separation can be seen.  When studied from the consciousness or sentiency aspect, unity emerges.  When the human stage is reached and self-awareness is blended with the sentiency of forms and with the tiny consciousness of the atom, some idea of a possible subjective unity begins dimly to dawn on the thinker's mind.  When the stage of discipleship is reached, a man begins to see himself as a sentient part of a sentient whole, and slowly reacts to the purpose and intent [57] of that whole.  He grasps that purpose little by little as he swings consciously into the rhythm of the sum total of which he is a part.  When more advanced stages and more rarefied and refined forms are possible, the part is lost in the whole; the rhythm of the whole subjects the individual to a uniform participation in the synthetic purpose, but the realisation of individual self-awareness persists and enriches the individual contribution, which is now intelligently and willingly offered, so that the form not only constitutes an aspect of the sum total (which has always and inevitably been the case, even when unrealised), but the conscious thinking entity knows the fact of the unity of consciousness and of the synthesis of life.  Thus we have three things to bear in mind as we read and study:

1. The synthesis of life
spirit.
2. The unity of consciousness
soul.
3. The integration of forms
body.

These three always have been at-one, but the human consciousness has not known it.  It is the realisation of these three factors and their integration into the technique of living which is, for man, the objective of his entire evolutionary experience.
Let us, talking necessarily in symbols, consider the universal Soul, or the consciousness of the Logos Who brought our universe into being.  Let us regard the Deity as pervading the form of His solar system with life, and as being conscious of His work, of His project and His goal.  This solar system is an appearance, but God remains transcendent.  Within all forms God is immanent, yet persists aloof and withdrawn.  Just as a thinking, intelligent human being functions through his body but dwells primarily in his mental consciousness or in his emotional processes, so God dwells withdrawn in His mind nature; the world that He has created and pervaded with His life, goes forward towards the goal for which He has [58] created it.  Within, however, the radius of His appearing form, greater activities are going forward; varying states of consciousness and stages of awareness are to be seen; developing degrees of sentiency emerge, and even in the symbolism of the human form we have such differing states of sentiency as are registered by the hair, by the internal organisms in the body, by the nervous system, by the brain, and by the entity we call the self (who registers emotion and thought).  In the same way does the Deity, within the solar system, express as wide a divergence of consciousness.
There is a body consciousness; there is a sensory apparatus, registering reaction to the environment; there is a consciousness of moods, of quality, of mental reactions to a world of ideas; there is a higher consciousness of plan and of purpose; there is a consciousness of life.
It is interesting to note in connection with the Deity that this sensory response to environment provides the entire basis for astrology and for the effect of the constellations upon the solar system and the interplanetary forces.
We might sum it all up in relation to man as follows: 
Man's form nature reacts in its consciousness to the form nature of Deity.  The outer garment of the soul (physical, vital and psychic) is part of the outer garment of God.
Man's self-conscious soul is en rapport with the soul of all things.  It is an integral part of the universal Soul, and because of this can become aware of the conscious purpose of Deity; can intelligently cooperate with the will of God, and thus work with the plan of Evolution.
Man's spirit is one with the life of God and is within him, deep-seated in his soul, as his soul is seated within the body.
This spirit will in some distant time put him en rapport with that aspect of God which is transcendent, and thus each son of God will eventually find his way to that centre—withdrawn [59] and abstracted—where God dwells beyond the confines of the solar system.
These are words which are formulated in an endeavour to convey an idea of order, of plan, of universal synthesis, of the integration and incorporation of the fragment in the whole, and of the part with the all.
Let us endeavour now to answer the second question, remembering as we proceed, that it is not possible for us to do more than enter symbolically into the practical purposes of Deity.  As I write for simple aspirants, I cannot convey the truth until such time as their rapport with their own souls is complete, or more complete than is now the case.  The effort, however, to grasp that which cannot be expressed in words produces a downpouring of the abstract mind or of the intuition, and this, in its turn, stimulates and develops the brain cells and produces a steady stabilisation of the power to stand in "spiritual being"; then it becomes possible to grasp the inexpressible and to live by its power.

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